Tag Archives: Practice Fusion

Expanding the Scope of EHRs II

Morgenthaler Ventures, a premier venture capital firm, announced August 25, 2011, the 11 finalists of their nationwide contest to find the most promising health IT startups looking for seed and Series-A funding. The contest was organized by Morgenthaler Ventures with co-organizers Silicon Valley Bank, Health 2.0 and Practice Fusion.

There are 22 finalists, 21 of which probably (or potentially) could link to a patient’s EHR. My speculation for each product is indicated in italics. Speculation, not knowledge about specific products, based in part on my two recent posts: Expanding the Scope of EMRs and Devices, Applications and EHRs

These products provide more evidence that EHRs must be designed to interface with “data devices” and apps that go way beyond the scope of most traditional EHRs systems.

Seed-Stage Finalists:

Careticker is the world’s first platform that helps patients plan in advance for a hospital or outpatient procedure. (Miami, FL) probable link to EHR for information

EyeNetra is the most affordable mobile eye diagnostic ever developed, allowing anyone to take their own eye test, get a prescription for glasses, and connect to eye-care providers all on a mobile phone. (Cambridge, MA) add results to EHR for complete record

Skimble powers the mobile wellness movement with a cross-platform ecosystem of fun and dynamic coaching applications. Its latest title, Workout Trainer, ranks Top 10 in the free Healthcare & Fitness category on iPhone/iPad.  (San Francisco, CA) possible data capture for EHR

SurgiChart is a mobile, cloud-based, social-clinical network for surgeons to exchange relevant perioperative, case-centric information. (Nashville, TN) could include data from or links to EHR

Telethrive provides patients an instant connection to doctors for a medical consultation using any telephone or computer with complete audio and video conferencing.  (Los Angeles, CA) possible links to EHR for data and recording results

Viewics provides hospitals with cloud-based analytics and business intelligence solutions which enable them to drive enhanced operational, financial and clinical outcomes.  (San Francisco, CA) probable links to EHR for data

Series-A Finalists:

 AbilTo develops and delivers online mental health programs to managed care members and enterprise workforces that help reduce payor costs while improving overall health outcomes. (New York, NY) probable links to EHR for de-identified data

Axial Exchange moves healthcare organizations towards pay-for-performance, enabling providers to coordinate care and measure clinical quality across disparate settings. (Raleigh, NC) EHR as source of data about treatment and results

Empower Interactive‘s online services deliver proven psychotherapy methodologies via an e-learning platform to greatly improve the economics and accessibility of mental and behavioral health solutions. (San Francisco, CA) potential links to EHR for treatment planning and results

Jiff is the first HIPAA-compliant iPad platform for patient education in the medical industry –used by doctors, nurses, patients and more. (San Francisco, CA) could be driven by data in patient’s EHR

YourNurseIsOn.com employs bi-directional text, phone and email communications to help hospitals and agencies put “the right healthcare providers, in the right places, right now.” (New Haven, CT) no apparent link to an EHR, interesting that this was at the end of the list.

Short link: wp.me/pyfFd-9V

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EMRs as Part of Larger Networks

Electronic medical records provide an alternative to paper based records. They are also a source of information that can be used as part of other processes to address a wide range of healthcare issues. Here’s one example:

Congress has passed a bill requiring food processors to implement systems to track cases of food that may be related to outbreaks of food-borne illness.

An estimated 76 million people contract food-borne illnesses in the U.S. each year, with 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Those illnesses cost the U.S. economy $152 billion a year in health care and related expenses. Rapid identification of the source of these illnesses and their removal from the market is critical.

Under the required tracking system, farmers would scan individual cases of produce, keeping records of where they are shipped. If a recall is ordered by the FDA, the records would be quickly disseminated to trace the current location of the recalled produce.

Once specific cases have been identified as carrying a food-borne illness, the new system will allow those cases to be removed from the market; however this is only part of a complete system. How can the illness be linked to specific cases of food? Here’s where an EMR system can help.

Most EMR systems provide for reporting of food-borne illnesses. By adding a few additional elements of information, the search for the source can be narrowed very quickly. When a doctor enters a diagnosis of food-borne illness, the system can ask for the type of food that is suspect, i.e., eggs, fish, spinach, etc., and the name of the market where the suspected food was purchased. The EMR can track doctors’ reports and when a target number of similar reports is reached an analysis can be launched. A single answer will not be helpful, but if the answers from several cases list the same food and the same market or chain, that provides a place to start. Appropriate information can be forwarded to a public agency.

Samples can be acquired, tests run, and the investigation focused on just a few likely sources. Once a case of food carrying an illness is found, the food processors’ system can be used to find all of the cases from a specific producer and they can be remove from the market.

There is one other piece to the complete solution and that is rapid access to a large enough number of records to find what may be an isolated set of incidents. There are a number of organizations including the VA, Kaiser, and vendors of hospital systems that have large databases and could report to public health agencies or the FDA. There are also physician office systems like Practice Fusion that are database driven and can quickly draw information from more than five million patient records today.

The tracking process from identification of a problem to a solution would look like this:

A Food Illness Tracking Process

This provides an illustration of the way an EMR can also be linked to other tracking systems to identify and facilitate the search for health issues such as some common types of sports injuries or automobile accident injuries. EMRs are clearly more than just systems to replace doctors’ paper records.

Short link: http://wp.me/syfFd-541